3 BEST Calisthenics Skills To Learn Beginners - Awais World

Welcome to awais world fitness website, Today I'm gonna be showing you three calisthenic skills that anyone can start learning no matter where you are. It takes zero equipment and it's gonna completely transform your physique and tremendously improve your skillset. Now, you've probably seen these three skills somewhere and thought to yourself, "Yeah, I'm never gonna be able to do that." But the truth is you definitely will. You just need to know what to train and how to train for it and that's what I'm gonna be showing you today. These three skills are also fundamentals of calisthenics. So they're gonna have you progress very quickly.

3 BEST Calisthenics Skills To Learn Beginners - Awais World

Every other more advanced skill, like the full planche, full planche pushups, handstand pushups, and so much more stems from the three exercises that I'll be showing you today, which is why these three skills are gonna condition and strengthen your body to be able to do more advanced exercises that require you to lift your body off the ground from your hands. 

And using your entire body weight for every rep is also gonna completely transform your physique, not just because you're working with a heavier overload, but also because you're recruiting a lot more muscle groups at once. And if you need more information and routines along the way, just visit awaisworld.com.

Calisthenics is an excellent form of bodyweight training that can help build strength, flexibility, and endurance.

Tips for Beginners:

  • Focus on proper form and technique to avoid injury. Quality repetitions are more important than quantity.
  • Start with a few sets of each exercise, gradually increasing the number of sets and repetitions as you get stronger.
  • Incorporate these exercises into a well-rounded routine that includes warm-up and cool-down stretches to improve flexibility and prevent muscle soreness.
  • Track your progress to stay motivated and set achievable goals.

The first skill we're gonna be breaking down is the L-sit hold. A lot of people have trouble with this exercise, but I'm gonna show you how to train for it as a complete beginner from the very beginning. And that's gonna be flexibility, hip flexor strength, core strength, and shoulder depression strength. We're gonna be covering all four of those in these progressions. So regularly stretching your hamstrings is gonna make it a lot easier. If you need some hamstring stretches and more info on the L-sit, check out the article I did.

"How To L-Sit Hold On The Floor."

Now let's start off with the very first progression. And keep in mind for the rest of this article, when it comes to calisthenics training, it's just like weights, but we increase the resistance over time using progressive overload. But instead of using weights, we use harder and harder progressions. With each progression, the angle of position will change, allowing more body weight to be applied. Once you're able to do an exercise comfortably with perfect form for the required amount of repetitions, then you're ready to move on and attempt the next harder progression. 

Now, starting off with the very first progression that anyone can do to start learning the L-sit hold, we're gonna sit with our back straight and flat against the wall, hands down on the ground, depressing with your shoulders, and we're gonna try to lift up our legs, just like that. Now, if that's too hard, you can always start with one leg first. You wanna be able to do 10 with each leg. And then eventually being able to do 10 with two legs. This move is gonna strengthen your hip flexors as well as increase the flexibility in your hamstrings.

 Once you can do 10 pumps with both legs, they don't want you to attempt to hold that position for at least 10 to 15 seconds. All right, so there you have it. Master these progressions. Once you can do them comfortably with perfect form for the required amount of repetitions, you're ready to move on and attempt the next progression.

Now moving on to progression number two, we're gonna be going for a tucked L-sit. Instead of doing it on the floor, we're gonna be doing it on an elevated surface. This is gonna require less core and hip flexor strength, so this is gonna be the best and easiest place to start off. And eventually, the better and stronger you get, you can move it down to the floor. So first things first, lemme show you what it looks like, and then I'll break it down. Now, to get into this exercise, you first wanna start off by just sitting down at the edge of your chair. Place your pumps on the surface and push down and depress your scapulas as hard as you can, while lifting your knees up and engaging your core. 

Now, this is a static hold, so the goal is to increase your hold time. When you're first starting off, you may only be able to hold it for a second or two, and that's okay. Go for three attempts in a row every minute on the minute until you improve. Eventually, the more you do it, the stronger you're gonna get. And over time, you want to attempt to hold it even longer and longer and break your record until you can comfortably hold it with perfect form for at least 15 seconds, you're ready to move on to the next progression.

All right, there you have the tucked L-sit hold. All right, moving on to the third progression. Now we're gonna increase the difficulty and bring it down to the floor with tucked L-sit walks. Lemme show you what it looks like, then I'll break it down for you. Now, to start off with this exercise, of course, you wanna start off in a tucked L-sit position. Place your hands on the ground just a little bit forward, then depress your scapulas down while lifting your knees and your hips. You'll take just a small step and keep inching your way forward for at least 10 reps. Now, if this is too difficult, you can always try doing this with your feet on the ground, one foot on the ground, and eventually no feet on the ground.

All right. So there you have it. The tucked L-sit walks. This is gonna be more difficult than the tucked L-sit you did before, because there's a lot less room for your legs, which means you need even more hip flexors, core strength, and shoulder depression to be able to lift your body high enough off the ground. But this is gonna directly prepare you and build your strength to be able to do the real L-sit hold. And by this point, you're already getting comfortable with lifting your entire body weight for reps. And now is when you're gonna start to see your body and skills really transform. Now, once you can do this comfortably with perfect form for at least 10 repetitions, then you're ready to move on and attempt the next progression. Now moving on to the fourth progression,

L-SIT Kicks

we're gonna be going for L-sit kicks. This is gonna be a lot more difficult, but by this time, you should have developed a lot more upper-body strength. So let me show you what it looks like and then I'll break it down for you. You wanna be able to start in a tucked L-sit position, then kick your legs out to a full range of motion, completely locked out and straight, and then bring them back into a tucked position. You wanna be able to do this as controlled as possible. But when you're first starting off, you may not be able to go all the way out and it may not be that controlled, but that's okay. 

Keep doing it every minute of the minute, maxing out, and eventually, you'll get stronger and you'll definitely improve. And again, I'm starting you off on a higher elevated surface, so that you have more room for your legs, but eventually you wanna build the strength and flexibility to be able to do it on the ground. But once you can do the tucked L-sit kicks with perfect form comfortably for at least 10 repetitions, you're ready to attempt the last and final progression to master your L-sit hold.

All right, so there's the L-sit kicks. For that last one, I just held it for a little bit longer, but just to give you an idea that the better you get at this, eventually you'll be able to kick out and just hold your legs out there completing the L-sit. All right, moving on to the last and final progression. After this, you should definitely be able to master your L-sit hold. We're gonna be going for tucked L-sit hold alternating legs. I'm gonna show you what it looks like and then break it down for you. It's very similar to the previous progression, but we're just gonna hold one leg out for a second, bring it in, and then alternate. 

Now, when you first start off, you may be doing it really fast and sloppy, but just like with every progression, the goal is to eventually do it controlled with perfect form. You wanna be able to do it for at least 10 reps with perfect form comfortably, and then you're ready to move on to the harder variation of this progression. The next way to do it would be to have one leg completely extended and have one leg tucked, so you're alternating with one leg sticking out.

And for a second there, as you're switching legs, you're actually holding an L-sit with both legs out. And the more you do this, you're gonna get stronger, and eventually over time, you're just gonna be able to put them both out. And you're gonna be able to hold that L-sit, even if it's just for a couple seconds, and then you know what to do. Attempt your L-sit hold every minute on the minute, increase your hold time, and there you have it, you mastered your L-sit. And once you've mastered the L-sit, you can then move into L-sit pull-ups, L-sit to handstand, front levers, start learning your planche, and so much more, because you have the strength and ability to hold your entire body weight off the ground. And now we're ready for the second skill. 

90 Degree Hold Moving

The second skill I'm gonna be showing you how to master, that's gonna be the 90-degree hold, and this is a very important exercise to have in your arsenal. This exercise is not only gonna develop insane upper body strength but also allow you to hold your entire body weight from a horizontal position and even rep it out eventually, developing superhuman strength in your shoulders, arms, core, as well as your lower back. And I'm gonna be showing you the very first progression that anyone can start doing to start mastering this exercise. 

That's gonna be a pushup hold. So all we're gonna do is get down on the ground and hold the bottom of a pushup. Right now we're just building the foundation. You wanna be able to hold this position very comfortably and with perfect form for at least 45 seconds. When you're at the bottom of your pushup, make sure that you're engaging everything in your body and your body should be in a completely straight line, not drooping and not too high, completely horizontal. You also wanna have your arms tucked in and not flared out to ensure that you're really using your arms as well. You look at the end result, it may seem impossible, but as you can see now, you've already started training for it. It's definitely doable.

All right, for the second progression, we're gonna be emphasizing strengthening our glutes as well as our lower back. That's actually what lifts the rest of our lower body. So for this exercise, we're just gonna need an elevated surface and we're gonna go from some leg raises. So we're gonna lay down, bring it in and extend. Make sure to really feel your lower back and your glutes every time you extend. Lock out your legs, and keep it straight. Now, when you get really comfortable with this, you wanna be able to hold it for time. 

There you have it, the second progression. Again, not too difficult. As you can see, we're building that foundation, one block at a time. That's gonna make it easier to move on to the harder progressions. And it's gonna compound when you put it all together to do some extraordinary things. So once you're able to do the reverse leg raises for at least 15 reps comfortably with perfect form and hold it for at least 15 to 20 seconds comfortably, then you're ready to attempt the next progression.

Pseudo Planche Pushups

All right, moving on to progression three. Things are gonna get a little more difficult. We're gonna be going for a pseudo-planche pushup. I'm gonna show you what that looks like and then we're gonna break it down. Slightly different from the normal pushup. You wanna lean as far as possible so that your hands are by your waistline, and then you wanna push from there. Now, it looks simple, but it's actually pretty difficult to do when you're first starting off. So for your first time or your first couple of times, don't go all the way down to your waistline. 

Just put your hands slightly lower and eventually, you'll develop more strength to be able to put your hands lower, lower, lower until you can comfortably push by your waistline. It's also gonna help the range of motion in your wrists to have your hands slightly pointed out with your thumbs pointing forward. Also, when first starting this progression, you may feel like as you're pushing, your body is sliding back and your hands are coming back up to the top. So one thing you can do to help fix that and to maintain that position is to put your feet against the wall. 

That'll also help indicate your progress of how low your hands are going. So with your feet pushed against the wall, you can't move anywhere. You'll start by pressing with your hands placed at the lower chest area and eventually place 'em a little bit lower, press, a little bit lower, press, till you're hitting it down by the waistline. Then you wanna start holding the bottom of the pseudo planche pushup for time with your hands by your waistline for at least 20 seconds. Once you've mastered all this comfortably with perfect form, you're ready to move on to the next progression.

All right, moving on to the fourth progression. This is gonna level up the previous progression and that's why you wanna make sure to really master that pseudo-planche hold. We're gonna be going for 90-degree alternating toe taps. And with this progression, you're gonna feel a real 90-degree hold even for just one second. I'm gonna go ahead and show you what it looks like and then break it down for you. Make sure that you can lean far enough forward, then you're gonna lift up one leg and then alternate them. 

In the beginning, you may feel like you're jumping up and coming down pretty hard. That's okay. The more you do it, the stronger you're gonna get. But eventually, you'll be able to switch and alternate a lot slower. The goal is actually to raise your leg versus kicking and jumping off. All right, there you have the 90-degree hold alternating toe taps. So you wanna be able to do the 90-degree alternating toe taps for at least 10 reps with perfect form comfortably, and then you're ready for the last and final progression.

All right, we're ready for the final progression. If you mastered the previous progression, then you should already be on your way to kinda holding the 90, but this one is gonna solidify it. We're gonna be going for 90-degree lean plus raises. It's just like the previous progression, but instead of lifting one leg, we're gonna lift both legs off the ground by leaning forward and then placing them back down. Remember, if you're not leaning forward enough and your hands aren't by your waistline, your lower body is never gonna get off the ground. 

You need to meet that balance point and have enough body weight on the opposing side, your upper body, to be able to raise your lower body. So now we'll finally get to apply it. I'm gonna go for a couple reps, show you what it looks like, then break it down. So as you can see, there's no jumping with this exercise. I'm leaning forward enough until my feet just rise off the ground. And every other previous progression is building you up for this. That's why you don't wanna skip any progressions and you wanna master each one, and build that solid foundation.

Remember the reverse leg raises and reverse leg extensions are what's gonna help you raise your lower body off the ground. So make sure to really diligently work those as well if you're having trouble with that. Also, keep in mind as you're leaning forward and you're ready to raise your legs that you give an extra contraction on your hands as well as the rest of your body to make sure that you're giving enough push to maintain that body position. And just like the previous progression with the alternating toe taps, in the beginning, you may be going up and down really quickly, but the more you do this, you'll be able to go up nice and slow, come down nice and slow until you're able to just come up and just hold it. Even if it's for a second or two, do it every minute on the minute and increase that hold time.

Pike Hold

All right, now moving on to the third and final skill, you're gonna be a well-rounded and complete athlete after this. I'm gonna be showing you how to hold your entire body weight from an inverted position with perfect balance and that's gonna be the handstand hold, developing insane balance, coordination, physique, and strength in your upper body. Don't worry about any excuses you may have if you're not strong enough or have enough coordination. We're gonna be building all of that up from the very beginning, just like all the previous skills. 

So the very first progression we'll be getting into is gonna be a pike hold and it's gonna have other variations as well that we'll get into right after. Let me show it to you and then I'll break it down. I start off in a pushup position and then I walk back with my core tight on the tips of my toes and straight locked-out legs as I move up. Your hips wanna be the highest point, kind of like a triangle; you wanna be in a straight line from your hands to your hips and your hips to your toes, engaging your core, your grip on the ground, your shoulders, and everything else with your arms straight and locked out.

All right, there you have it. Most simple progression, a pike hold. You wanna be able to hold this position for at least 45 seconds. And this is a relatively easy exercise, so you'll be able to do it pretty quickly and that's why you wanna add more variations to this movement. Once you can comfortably hold a pike hold, then you wanna move into holding a pike hold and doing shoulder taps, doing pike hold pushups, and then eventually moving into pike walks. 

All of these are gonna strengthen your shoulders, preparing to eventually hold your entire body weight inverted on your shoulders in a handstand position. With the strength you'll gain from these exercises, you'll be able to increase the difficulty and create even more resistance to your pike by elevating your feet and doing an elevated pike hold. And once you can do the different elevated pike variations, the shoulder taps for at least 10 in a row, elevated pike pushups for at least 10 in a row, and the elevated pike hold for at least 20 to 30 seconds, then you're ready to move on to the next progression.

But the next progression we're gonna be going for is gonna be wall walks. I'm gonna show you how to do it and then I'm gonna break it down for you. So to start off, you wanna be in a pushup position, then put one foot against the wall and slowly start to walk back and walk with your feet and your hands at the same time. You also don't wanna take big steps with your hands and feet. You wanna take smaller steps with your hands and feet, so it's a lot more comfortable. You also wanna make sure to maintain your core strength and maintain your body in a straight line. And when you're doing this for the first time, you don't have to walk up all the way up the wall. Just walk up as high as you comfortably can and then come back down. 

All right, so there we have the wall walks. Eventually, you're gonna build the shoulder strength and the confidence to go higher and higher, until eventually, your chest is just flat against the wall. Then you can go ahead and walk all the way back down. But go at your own pace starting off and eventually work your way up to that. You're really gonna need to master all the previous progressions to have the strength to be able to do this. So master this until you can reach all the way to the top and be able to do it comfortably with perfect form for at least four to five reps. Once you can do that, you're ready to move on to one of the last progressions.

Alright, so by this point, you should have developed the strength to be able to hold your entire body weight inverted, especially if you mastered those wall walks. And we're gonna be applying that in these last progressions, starting off with a handstand kick-up. So to start off, we're gonna start in a pushup position, specifically a runner's start position. You wanna be staring at a point on the ground that's above your hands. So your hands and the point that you're staring at make a triangle. And you never wanna look away from this spot, because any micro-movement of your head is drastically gonna push your body either backwards or forwards. 

You want your hands placed shoulder-width apart and you want your fingertips aligned with the tip of your shoulders. From here, you're gonna kick with your bent leg and swing with your straight leg while leading with your hips, meaning that the first thing to come up should be your hips and your feet should follow along with it. That's when you wanna start pairing both of your legs together until you reach the top of the wall and you wanna be in a tight straight line always.

In fact, when it comes to kicking up and holding a handstand, you wanna be in a completely stacked position. Think of your body as a stack of books. It's gonna be a lot easier to walk around with a stack of books than if the stack of books were all staggered; it's gonna be a lot easier to fall over when you're walking around. So keep that in mind when you're doing anything inverted that has to do with handstands. And once you're finally able to kick up and hold it against the wall, it's just a matter of holding it for a time as well as increasing your kick-up reps. 

Now, these are two things that you can train separately. Train for increasing your hold time once you kick up, starting off with 10 seconds, moving on to 15, 20, and eventually one minute, and separately training your handstand kick-ups, just kicking up against the wall until you're comfortably in a handstand and coming back down and doing it for a couple reps, like five to 10 reps per set.

That's gonna solidify your handstand kick-up and develop the proper strength and balance to be able to kick up into a handstand wherever you're at. Now, once you can hold a handstand kick up against the wall, you can pretty much already handstand, all you have to do is learn how to balance, and that's gonna be different techniques, like finger pressing and releasing, pulsing the pressure in your fingertips until your feet pry off the wall and then releasing the pressure in your fingertips so that your feet can come back. 

That's how you balance in a handstand. But for a complete breakdown on how to do this perfectly, just watch the video I uploaded not too long ago on how to handstand hold where I break down the entire handstand step by step, as well as the finger pressing technique a lot more in-depth. We post every single Monday by 11:00 a.m. USA Eastern time.

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